Monthly Archives: October 2014

Making a full spectrum camera — Canon EOS-M teardown

I recently found out about the Canon EOS ‘M’. It’s a very lightweight, cheap (~$350) Canon camera that can accept all the standard lenses (with an adaptor). I was about to write ‘DSLR’ there instead of camera, but technically it isn’t as … Continue reading

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Water drop photography

After my recent experiments into DSLR shutter lag (here and here), I finally got to use my camera the way I was intending. Set up: I started out with the kickstarter kit from here which is very well thought out. I’ve … Continue reading

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Measuring the shutter lag on a DSLR – Part 2

In the last post I explained how I made the LED timing device for measuring the shutter lag on my DSLR. The first way I wanted to test triggering the camera was by using the IR remote control. If I could get … Continue reading

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Measuring the shutter lag on a DSLR – Part 1

A while ago we did some playing around with water drop photography and high speed flash: It’s rather satisfying, but getting it all tuned and setting up the shot is not that easy to do. As part of it, I wanted … Continue reading

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Thermal imaging close up – Part 2

I made a new mount to hold the lasercutter lens. It’s sized to fit snugly into the rubber mounting of the camera, and there’s a piece of folded copper wire as a removal tab:  Here’s some more close up images:   … Continue reading

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Thermal imaging close up

A friend of mine linked me to an excellent video where Mike shows how to modify a thermal camera to have a closeup lens: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lie771fzBaw&feature=youtu.be&list=UUcs0ZkP_as4PpHDhFcmCHyA Thermal cameras are beautiful things, but the wavelengths of light they work with are a tad … Continue reading

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Lens testing made simple

There’s two widely used standards for small lenses, C mount and CS mount. They can both screw into the same socket, and it can be tricky to figure out which is which. If you get it wrong you’ll end up … Continue reading

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