The Crystallographer’s Watch

Finished product v01.JPG

Here’s a project I made almost accidentally on the way to a later design. I’ve wanted to make my own watch for a while now. It’d allow me to pick and choose all the features I really want, and it’s a fun exercise in design to try and figure out which features work smoothly, that I’d appreciate having everyday, and which features are more ‘fads’ that I can do without.

I have a metal CNC machine, so carving the watch body from solid metal is doable (if somewhat fiddly and time consuming). And it’s really cheap to design and make your own circuit boards these days, so the electronics are fairly easy.

But it occurred to me that this is still a multi-stage process, which plenty of opportunity to loose energy or procrastinate. If I wouldn’t get that reinforcing emotional feedback/reward until WATCH_CASE_DESIGN + MILLING + ELECTRONICS + SOFTWARE are all done, that’s a very long chain with plenty of ways it can fail.

So, as a way to break the the project into chunks, I figured I’d start with the circuit board only.
I bought a large men’s watch 2nd hand watch on gumtree and pulled out the guts, this left me with a big empty enclosure I can fill with my custom electronics.
Unmodified watch v01.JPG

I measured up the internal space I can use, and I lasercut a couple of ‘dummy’ cylinders of the same size:

Internal case dimensions v01.JPGdummy cylinder v01.JPG

The idea is that as long as whatever electronics I come up with are smaller than the dummy cylinders, I’ll have no surprises when it comes to assembly.

At that point I realised that the empty watch was essentially a wrist mounted display case.

The other day I’d been playing around with small ball bearings, to make a ‘bubble raft’ style display like those popularized by Sir Lawrence Bragg.

I figured that with a bit of fiddling, I could make a watch mounted version I could take anywhere. So I laser cut another plug, and some circular rings hold off the wood from the glass, which allowed the balls to move freely.

Ball bearing insert v02.JPG
It took a bit of tweaking to ensure the balls didn’t have enough space to ‘double pack’ when tilted. Brett and I had to have several rounds of taking it apart, sanding the ring down carefully, then reassembling before it worked nicely.

There’s a lot of interesting structure in the raft. You can see how the balls pack in regular order at a local scale, but don’t line up on a global scale.

Raft coloured v01.JPG

Grain boundaries and sphere packing

(Also note the red areas with square packing, everywhere else seems to be the more efficient hexagonal packing).

Every time you look at your wrist you’ll see a different pattern. Sometimes regular, sometimes chaotic. And by tapping and jiggling, you can often ‘anneal’ the structure into a lower energy state. Here’s one pattern that’s been annealed a bit.

Raft coloured v02.JPG

The watch annealed into a much more regular shape

(Note the lovely grain boundary, and two large grains which have steadfastly refused to merge together).

The semi-randomness of the pattern is quite appealing. The eye has no problems picking up the detail, and you can often see grain boundaries more easily than the individual balls. And with a quick flick, you can get a whole new arrangement. Sort of a wrist mounted I-Ching.

I’ve been wearing it for two days now, and it’s rather soothing. In fact it’s an anti-watch.
(Since a regular watch tells you the time and makes you stressed. This tells you absolutely nothing, but makes you calmer)

 

 

 

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